OK, folks… here we are at the end of another MLB season. What’s happening? The player shuffle.

Every year at this time, and up until just before spring training, teams all over are shuffling players and payrolls like there’s no tomorrow; which there may not be, if the greedy MLB owners don’t agree to level the playing field when it comes to salaries and profits.

As I understand it, the NFL has a profit sharing program between teams. If you buy a Dallas Cowboy’s t-shirt at a game, the profits are divvied up between all the NFL teams. That’s pretty cool, right? It helps our less popular teams, like the Cleveland Browns, who don’t sell as many t-shirts.

We also know that there is a salary cap in the NFL. This means that no team can be paying more to their players than any other team. What happens in this socialistic program? Well, fairness for one thing. You don’t have any year-after-year dynasties winning the Super Bowl because their payrolls are 52 bazillion dollars; with the closest contenders only having payrolls of 1 bazillion.

This is what Major League Baseball has needed for… well, forever. It would take the agreement of all the MLB owners, as it did for the NFL, to implement something like this. I believe that it is becoming more and more critical to baseball, if it wants to survive as a mainstream sport.

Fans of baseball really get pissed and turned off when owners cry poor mouth and bitch because fans aren’t coming to see the games. Well, fans don’t appreciated the way owners treat their favorite players or how they pinch pennies when it comes to paying those players. Every fan wishes his team had a payroll like the Yankees. That ain’t gonna’ happen, though.

So, what’s the solution? What can be done to allow outstanding players and fan favorites, like the Tampa Bay Rays’ Carl Crawford, stay with the team? There’s going to have to be a salary cap and profit sharing structure agreed to by the MLB ownership.

Sports writers have been harping on this for years. The owners don’t seem to be listening. Or, at least, the owners of the super-popular money-making teams aren’t listening. Why should they? What would be their motivation to self limit themselves and actually have to compete? There isn’t any, sadly… other than their ethical obligation to improve the game and do whatever is necessary to make it a viable sport into the future. Ethics? HA! Yeah… right.

I love baseball. It’s my favorite sport to watch. It was my favorite sport to participate in as a child. Baseball always gives me a comfortably melancholy feeling of better times passed. I’d hate to see baseball pass.

Later…

~Eric

Image credits:

1) pre-modified cap – freeclipartnow.com

2) baseball boy – clipartheaven.com

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About V. T. Eric Layton

vtel57, Nocturnal Slacker

4 responses »

  1. Kips says:

    I think the main stumbling block will be the Yankees, as they own MSG and the cable rights to broadcast games, this is where they make their money and I can’t believe any Steinbrenner would be willing to share this…(RIP George)

    • Yup. You know for sure that the Yankee organization would be at the top of the “nay” list in any vote about salary caps or profit sharing; probably Boston, too, for that matter.

      Thanks for reading and commenting, Kips! 🙂

      ~Eric

  2. Kips says:

    Boston may be up to it, the ownership group just bought Liverpool FC and they are always open to new ideas by the looks of it.

    if anything, it will come down to the owners, it took like forever and a lockout for the NHL players association to wake up and get the message that the league was pricing itself out of ordinary Joe’s hands, and the lockout really hurt their credibility as a group of professionals. Greed was apparent..

    So the ML Players Association lawyers will also fight against a salary cap to protect their clients (re:Players) interests…and the agents…;) Look for some sort of lockout by the owners to shake it up…

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